Healthy Diets for Kids | Brianna Boutin, NP-C

Healthy Diets for Kids | Brianna Boutin, NP-C


Your diet is directly linked to how you feel on a daily basis—your confidence level, your academic performance, your
sports performance—it impacts every point in your life. So I think that it
needs to be front and center and in everybody’s minds. We have this 5-2-1-0 +
10 motto that we like to go by at this office. So you’ve probably heard of it,
it’s big in the state of Maine now. Five servings of fruits or vegetables a day,
two hours or less of screen time. That includes smartphones, computers, tablets, TVs. Any type of screen. One hour or more of physical activity, and zero
sugary drinks a day, plus 10 hours of sleep. So healthy quick snacks for kids
are really fun especially in the summer time. So what I like to tell
parents is that you want to give your child the opportunity to eat every two
to three hours so that they stay satiated and energized throughout the
day. What that usually looks like is a small serving of protein, a healthy fat
and a long-acting carb. So cheese sticks and an apple or peanut butter and a
piece of fruit or Greek yogurt. Anything like that that fits within their dietary
preferences or any, you know, dietary needs that they have. Good habits that
families can have that helps to promote health and healthy eating in the house,
definitely cooking together and sitting down for your meals, and I’m a firm
believer that what you you can contribute to the health of the
community that you live in by buying fresh foods locally, taking those home
and showing your kids, you know, different ways of cooking foods,
particularly vegetables that they may not have liked before, but if you try
seasoning them differently or cooking them a different way, and just continuing
to you know try new things. Infants and what they should eat is
probably one of the most common questions that I get here because
parents really want to set their kids up for successful eating habits later on in life. So, really continuing to introduce a
variety of different foods to the infant is all that you really need to do. They
may refuse it, they might spit it at you, they might throw it at you one time, but
that doesn’t mean that they’re not going to like it again. As soon as they’re able
to start picking up foods, you can like chop up pretty much everything that
you’re eating yourself just to see how they can–how they’ll tolerate it and
just keep reintroducing and eventually their palate will change and they will
eat vegetables, I promise. There are certain foods that you should introduce
first to your child and it’s traditionally what we’ve recommended for
a while. So, it’s the oat cereal or the rice cereal, is a really good first food
for babies and it helps them get used to a different texture, it’s not a choking
hazard at all. And then from there generally trying different types of
vegetables, so green vegetables first and then moving along to like sweet potatoes,
carrots, squash, and then introducing fruits. So in general what you want to do
is one new food, no more than every three days, and if they tolerate it fine you
can go ahead and incorporate that into their you know daily food regimen. And
then, combining foods, purees later on, after they have they’ve showed you that
they can tolerate that food is a good idea. So food labels for babies — you want to always try to buy organic when possible. I
understand that that’s not always possible depending on where you’re
shopping, but you want to look for the least amount of added ingredients. One,
two, three ingredients at the most and it should be just food, it shouldn’t be
preservatives or anything that you can’t pronounce.

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